Community Corrections

Paul O'Connell, Operations Director

Community Corrections Mission Statement

The mission of Community Corrections is to enhance community safety and reduce harm to citizens by positively impacting lives.

Community Corrections Vision Statement

A partner for safer communities.

The responsibility of the Community Corrections Bureau of the Arizona Department of Corrections (ADC) is to protect the public through community based supervision of offenders upon release from an institution and/or offenders accepted under the Interstate Compact (ISC) until expiration of their term of supervision.

Community Corrections ensures the accurate release, effective re-entry, transition and supervision of offenders released to the community utilizing a continuum of supervision services, strategies, evidence based programs and meaningful incentives and sanctions. Community Corrections facilitates the swift return to custody of those offenders who violate conditions of supervision and who represent a serious threat to the safety of the community. Community Corrections provides meaningful interaction with victims to maintain public protection.

Offenders under Community Supervision must follow standard conditions of supervision as well as any special conditions that the assigned Community Correctional Officer deems appropriate based on the offender's criminal history.

Interstate Compact Services Unit (ICS): Coordinates parole transfers to and from Arizona. The Unit serves as the central location for interstate information and special investigation requests from other states on pardons, clemency investigations and pre-sentence reports. Unit staff act as liaisons with various state and local criminal justice agencies when procedural problems arise. The unit administers the Interstate Agreement for Detainers for Inmates incarcerated elsewhere who are returned to Arizona for trial on untried criminal charges. The Interstate Compact is a formal agreement between member states that seeks to promote public safety by systemically controlling the interstate movement of certain adult offenders.

New Payment Methods for Community Corrections Fees Effective January 1, 2015

Parole Office Locations

Standard Conditions of Supervision

Important Statewide Numbers

Community Supervision

The Community Corrections Bureau ensures the accurate release, effective re-entry, transition and supervision of offenders released to the community utilizing a continuum of supervision services, strategies and evidenced based programs. Community Corrections also facilitates the swift return to custody of those offenders who violate conditions of supervision and who represent serious threats to the safety of the community.

Community Supervision ensures inmates are returned to prison if they violate their terms of parole

Community Supervision provides community based supervision for the protection and restoration of victims, the community and offenders. Major duties of Community Corrections include the operation of 2 Community Reentry Centers, 22 field and support units located in 12 field offices throughout the state, staffed by 216 community corrections staff supervising approximately 5500 active offenders in the community. Community Supervision also facilitates the swift return to custody of those offenders who violate conditions of supervision and who represent serious threats to the safety of the community.

Specialized Caseloads

Electronic Monitoring supervises all offenders released on parole or community supervision that require electronic monitoring for offenders that have a past or current conviction for a crime designated as Dangerous Crimes Against Children as outlined in A.R.S. 13-604.01 and 13-705 or for individuals placed under House Arrest by the Arizona Board of Executive Clemency.

Special Needs assists offenders who have been determined to have high General Mental Health needs to include Seriously Mentally Ill (SMI) offenders, as well as those offenders with severe physical impairments who have been placed on community supervision. Officers assigned to this unit have special training to serve these populations and forge relationships with integrated healthcare service providers to more effectively serve these populations. 

Arizona Automated Reporting Supervision (AARS) allows low risk offenders to have minimum reporting requirements as compared to other supervision categories. Offenders report monthly using an automated call in procedures to the supervising officer advising of current address, participation in education, employment and treatment programs, etc.   The supervising officer monitors their offenders to determine if police contact was made and document their findings.  Community Corrections believes that based upon the risk, need and treatment principles of Evidence Based Practices (EBP), it would be more advantageous to remove those offenders, who meet the eligibility criteria, from a standard active field caseload

Veteran’s Caseload supervises all offenders that have veteran status, and are released to Maricopa County and parts of Pinal County. The supervising officer is a combat veteran and because of this, he has the ability to connect with the veterans assigned to his caseload to effectively navigate the VA system to better address their special needs.

Many of the veterans suffer from PTSD and other trauma that has not been addressed. Veterans are placed in a specialized trauma-informed care programs which utilize both one on one and group counseling.  Community Corrections has also partnered with the Veterans’ Administration VA Peer Support Specialists and Re-entry Specialists that meet one on one with the newly released offenders.   DES Veterans Workforce Specialists also are utilized in addition to the VA to assist with employment resources.

Community Reentry Centers

Pima Reentry Center Entrance

The Pima Reentry Center (formerly Southern Region Community Corrections Center) was first established in December 2012 as an alternative to a return to custody. This program offers structure, supervision, surveillance, and drug/alcohol education and treatment opportunities to offenders who are in technical violation of their conditions of supervised released and /or who are in need of additional structured support to successfully complete community supervision. The targeted population includes those offenders who are considered to be a high risk to recidivate but a low risk to the community, technical violators of their conditions of supervised release and offenders who are homeless and in need of short term emergency housing.

Maricopa Reentry Center Entrance

In July 2016, the department opened its second Reentry Center in Maricopa County. Both programs have the goal to make community supervision more effective in protecting the public by responding to supervision violations swiftly and with certainty.  The programs reduce the number of violators who require revocation by responding to negative behavior before it reaches a level of seriousness requiring incarceration and by making sure all appropriate intermediate community alternatives are used before return to custody.

Administrative Support

The Absconder Reduction Program (ARP) in Maricopa County is a pilot program to successfully identify offenders who have absconded from ADC supervision status and to attempt to make contact with those absconders to bring them back under supervision with their terms of release. After an offender absconds from supervision, ARP letters are then mailed out to family and friends in an attempt to make contact with these offenders. Once an offender receives the ARP letter and calls in, they are provided with information about the program and given a next report date.  This program offers an alternative to incarceration while providing the offenders the resources and opportunity to successfully complete their term of supervision, thus lowering recidivism.

Sex Offender Coordination Unit (SOCU) reviews all sex offenders cases up to one year prior to their release to determine if they are subject to the statutory requirements of Sex Offender Registration (ARS §13-3821), Community Notification (ARS §13-3825), and/or civil commitment under Arizona’s “Sexually Violent Person” (SVP) statute (ARS §36-3701). The Unit also provides ongoing training to local police and sheriff's offices on the sex offender community notification process in Arizona. Unit staff coordinates all sex offender referrals to the county attorney under the state's Sexually Violent Persons statutes.

Interstate Compact Services Unit (ICS) coordinates parole transfers to and from Arizona. The Unit serves as the central location for interstate information and special investigation requests from other states on pardons, clemency investigations and pre-sentence reports. Unit staff acts as liaisons with various state and local criminal justice agencies when procedural problems arise. The unit administers the Interstate Agreement for Detainers for Inmates incarcerated elsewhere who are returned to Arizona for trial on untried criminal charges. The Interstate Compact is a formal agreement between member states that seeks to promote public safety by systemically controlling the interstate movement of certain adult offenders.

The Warrant Services Hearings Unit is responsible for obtaining, processing and monitoring all warrants requested, issued and received by and for Community Corrections. Responsibilities include entering warrant data into ACIC/NCIC data base, confirming warrants for other agencies, quashing warrants approved by Community Corrections Manager, monitoring of a detainer caseload of offenders on supervision, and maintaining the warrant data base for statistical purposes on all arrests, warrants issued, quashed, and canceled.  Other duties include providing testimony before the Board of Executive Clemency (BOEC) during revocation hearings, conducting administrative and ISC probable cause hearings and maintaining statistics on revocation hearings.

Release Unit processes all release programs for offenders being released from prison to serve Community Supervision pursuant to all statutory sentencing schemes (Truth in Sentencing), Board of Executive Clemency Releases (Home Arrest, Parole, Work Furlough) and Legislative release programs (Transition Program and Community Accountability Program).

Programs - Contracts

Transition Program (ARS§ 31-281, 31-282: SB1291/HB2298/SB1093) funding was established in 2003, via SB 1291 to provide reentry programming to non-DUI offenders. In 2009, legislation expanded eligibility to additional non-violent drug offenders through SB1093. This law stipulates that the Arizona Department of Corrections shall contract with a private or nonprofit entity to provide eligible offenders transitional services.  Inmates may be released up to 90 days early in order to complete the program. 

Community Accountability Program (CAP) funding provides programs available to Community Supervision offenders who have a history of substance abuse and whose conduct demonstrates a need for additional treatment, intervention and oversight. CAP is utilized to address violations of supervised conditions and/or offenders who pose a high risk to recidivate. CAP is funded by the state Spirit Tax and delivered through contracted services to provide cognitive behaviorally based counseling, electronic monitoring and/or transdermal alcohol detection monitoring. Formerly a Legislative program (ARS 41-1609.05) expired as of July 2012). ADC has since adopted the program with established internal eligibility criteria.

Pima Reentry Center Entrance

Residential Community Behavior Modification Program (A.R.S. § 42-3106) funds residential treatment programs for offenders in the community who are having difficulty on community corrections status and are high risk/high need, relapsing into drug use and/or demonstrate additional high needs, to include Serious Mental Illness (SMI). The program includes two program tracks:  Sanctions- a swift invention which includes residency with a brief cognitive assignment to address poor decision making and improve coping skills; Residential treatment- includes residential substance abuse treatment for up to 90 days. Additionally, the program offers stabilization services to those requiring medication adjustments, stabilization, enhanced oversight and case management. Contracted programs are available in Maricopa and Pima Counties.

Urinalysis Drug Testing funding provides statewide drug testing services with TASC for all individuals under community supervision.

GPS Monitoring and Equipment Services funding provides electronic monitoring services to for individuals convicted of Dangerous Crimes Against Children offenses as outlined in A.R.S. 13-604.01 and 13-705 and for individual place under House Arrest by the Arizona Board of Executive Clemency.

The Absconder Reduction Program (ARP) in Maricopa County is a pilot program to successfully identify offenders who have absconded from ADC supervision status and to attempt to make contact with those absconders to bring them back under supervision with their terms of release. After an offender absconds from supervision, ARP letters are then mailed out to family and friends in an attempt to make contact with these offenders. Once an offender receives the ARP letter and calls in, they are provided with information about the program and given a next report date. This program offers an alternative to incarceration while providing the offenders the resources and opportunity to successfully complete their term of supervision, thus lowering recidivism.

Grants

2016 Second Chance Act Statewide Adult Recidivism Reduction Strategic Plan Implementation Grant is a 12-month grant (with two potential 12-month extensions). Under the grant extension recidivism reduction strategies developed during the Recidivism Reduction Strategic Planning Grant period are actively being implemented throughout ADC and the state. The goal of the grant is to reduce recidivism and enhance safety of Arizona communities. This is being accomplished through the efforts of expanded statewide stakeholder collaborations, use of various targeted risk/need/responsivity methods, evidence-based programs/training, assessment/evaluation, increased community initiatives and technical assistance to enhance existing coalitions and increase statewide coalition building. Institution and Community Corrections staffs responsible for offender case management are trained in Motivational Interviewing and EPICS.

Director Charles Ryan and ADC team members accept DoJ Recidivism Reduction Award

Gang, Drug, Violent Crime Control (GDVCC) is a grant provided by the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission for FY 2018. The grant provides Moral Reconation Therapy (MRT) for 100 debriefed gang members at the Arizona State Prison.  It also provides additional funding for evaluation and research as contracted with Arizona State University (ASU).

Interagency Community Reintegration Collaborations

Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System’s (AHCCCS) Targeted Investment Program (TIP) program will provide medical, mental health, and substance abuse assessment services for those offenders reentering the community.  Upon release from prison, offenders will, after their initial assessment, be referred to a participating community “home clinic” for continued services in Maricopa, Pima, and Yuma counties.  

Department of Economic Security Az. @ Work Program embeds DES employment specialists at Employment Community Corrections Offices and Community Corrections Reentry Centers.  The program is designed to provide job readiness, employment fairs and job placements services to community offenders.

Maricopa County Smart Justice Pilot program provides intensive employment/vocational case management services to a targeted 25-50 offenders.  The program includes fully integrated case management for up to one year for high risk/need individuals.